Seraphus is currently looking to recruit one IAAS Level 1 Immigration Caseworker [or an unaccredited candidate with at least one years experience in asylum law]

Seraphus is currently looking to recruit one IAAS Level 1 Immigration Caseworker [or one unaccredited candidate with at least one-years experience in asylum law and have a willingness to achieve Level 1 accreditation shortly after joining Seraphus] to work at our office in Shepherd’s Bush.

The new team member is expected to work on a supervised caseload and cover the team when required. The work will relate to asylum and Article 3 based applications. The new team member will report to the Director.

Seraphus is a small, expanding practice, as such the new team member will need to be flexible and willing to work in, and around, an expanding firm. The new team member is expected to have case and time management skills, strong organisational skills, and the ability to work under pressure.


Salary: Up to £24,000 depending on experience [negotiable for exceptional candidates].

Closing date: 18 August 2014

How to Apply: If you are interested in applying for this role, please download the application pack from the link below, or visit our website, and return it by the closing date by email to recruitment@seraphus.co.uk or by post.

Contact: Christopher Desira

Address: 100A Threshold House, 65 Shepherd’s Bush Green, London, W12 8TX


Application Links:

Application Form [Pages]

Application Form [Word]

Application Form [PDF]

High Court finds that the operation of the Detained Fast Track asylum system is unlawful

In a landmark ruling in a case brought by Detention Action, the High Court has today found that the way the government operates the Detained Fast Track asylum system is unlawful.

In a judgment between Detention Action and the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with the Equality Human Rights Commission as an intervener, handed down on 9 July 2014, the Judge (Ouseley J) ruled that ‘the DFT as operated carries an unacceptably high risk of unfairness.’

The Judge highlighted failings in the Fast Track system and made suggestions as to how they might be remedied, but found that these did not by themselves lead to the system being inherently unlawful. However, the Judge said that lawyers were instructed too late and there was an unjustified period of activity between induction of the asylum seeker into the system and the allocation of lawyers, this was unfair and can be remedied by instructing lawyers earlier in the process.

However, even if the Home Office allows for earlier instructions of lawyers the other deficiencies in the system may still mean that there are instances of unfairness in individual cases.

Please read the press release from Detention Action for further information on the judgement and the Fast Track process.
Detention Action DFT Press Release copy 2Detention Action DFT Press Release copy